Knifty Knitter

One husband, two kids, lots of pets, little time to knit. Yet I find time anyway.

Sunday, February 26, 2006

SWEET! Mary Jane

....only because I promised....





These past 16 days have gone by fast, and when I look at the completed sweater I realize just how many hours, how many precious hours, were spent knitting her up. I kind of wonder if because I finished did I challenge myself enough. Did I pick something that I knew I could finish, just so I could have the satisfaction? The honest answer? No. Many times I sat down to knit I became entranced-I was in 'the zone' and amazed at how fast the stitches came. I did not worry about finishing, at least not as much as I worried about doing my personal best, and having the sweater come out right-so I would be able to wear it when all was said and done. The bottom line is I do not enjoy knitting sweaters for myself-too much pressure. When I knit a garment for somebody else, after it leaves me and ends up in their hands I have no control over what gets done with it. Knitting for myself is different-I feel badly if the sweater just sits there on the shelf, because I am unhappy with the way it fits. Sure, I could correct whatever it is that is bothering me, but more often than not I just soothe my ego by knitting something-for someone else. In the end, part of my personal victory was deciding from the get-go that if I did indeed finish, I would wear it, and I will wear it with pride. So I blocked her, and then carefully sewed on her buttons. When I was weaving in the ribbon along the collar, I began to feel those familiar butterflies in my stomach. Was it going to be to big? Hang funny? Would I be comfortable wearing it in public? Those are all the things that plague me when I knit for myself. So I sucked it in, put it on, and looked in the mirror. The most important thing I have learned from this whole experience, aside from the fact that I can indeed knit and block a sweater in less than 16 days if I wanted to, is that I can meet a goal I set for myself. I can do it, and not only that, I enjoyed it. I have a renewed faith in myself and my knitting ability. For every thing I have knit that turned out less than stellar (and there are many), there is this triumph. I'll admit-I am pretty happy with myself. Isn't that what the Knitting Olympics was all about? Capturing the spirit of the games-the desire to test one's own limits, and see how far you can go. Not winning or losing, but looking deep down in ourselves and facing what we know we can do-even if we are not sure we can actually succeed. Let's face it-life gets in the way. Work, sick kids, vacations, housework-whatever. I mean, except for a few tense weeks in December, knitting is usually not high on my priority list of things that need to get done. These past two weeks people began to run out of underwear, spoons, milk, patience and at one point I almost forgot what color the carpet was due to the fact I had not seen it in awhile, what with the amount of toys and papers covering it. After all, knitting is supposed to be about relaxing, and something to enjoy, not a race against the clock. A few had to throw down the needles, and realized some things are not worth beating yourself up about. Perhaps at a different time, they too could have finished. It is more about trying. Watching the games on television, I get really pissed when the announcers say "too bad, they will have to settle for silver", because for many athletes it is just the experience of being able to call themselves an Olympian that matters. Personal best-that is the bottom line.

Now don't get me wrong-I am going to have my moment-


And to the "little people" and the big guy who helped make it possible:





Thank you for allowing me my space, my time, and putting up with my constant need to be left alone focus. Couldn't have done it without you!

And to Stephanie, for putting out the challenge, and for all involved in the countless hours spent organizing everything. I did indeed learn something from all this: sometimes the most important person to believe in is yourself.

Congrats to all the athletes-cheers!!!

6 Comments:

  • Well put! You did a great job on your Mary Jane and it looks beautiful on you. Wear with pride!

    By Anonymous Kelly, at 5:23 PM  

  • What a beautiful sweater! It will look great with the gold medal! :)

    By Blogger AmyArtisan, at 5:58 PM  

  • WOOHOO!!! Gold, baby, GOLD!! And yes, I know it's not about the color of the medal or the presence of a medal at all, but when you've got GOLD, you've got to flaunt it!! ;-) Your SMJ is BEAUTIFUL!! It looks gorgeous on you! The color is so pretty on you. Congratulations to you- that is so awesome! I know how limited knitting time can be with two little ones (and one big one ;-)) and I'm so amazed at how fast you managed to crank SMJ out, especially with all the lace work. If I looked that cute in any of the sweaters I made, I'd be wearing it everyday till it felted from all the wear. ;-) Your threesome are adorable, too! Now get running to that podium and take care, Teresa! :-) love, c.

    By Blogger candsmom, at 7:49 PM  

  • What a wonderfully inspiring post, T! and of course, the SMJ is beautiful ;) I know I would not have been able to handle all of that lace - you have much more patience! I loved reading your description of how your skills have improved, and how you feel accomplished for doing this project. Go T! You won the gold! ;)

    Much love to you, girlfriend!

    By Blogger Lolly, at 11:31 AM  

  • New here and I just had to say that your project looks awesome and I LOVE your hair and glasses...too cute

    By Blogger Melissa, at 9:24 AM  

  • Wow, your Sweet Mary Jane is beautiful~! Wonderful post, certainly captures all of my feelings about the Knitting Olympics!

    By Blogger christine, at 1:21 PM  

Post a Comment

<< Home